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Prepping For SHTF

Tag: Stockpiling food

Stockpiling Mountain House Freeze Dried Pouches

A question to the reader, “Are you stockpiling Mountain House freeze dried pouches?” Let’s be honest, there are a number of reasons that can be debated for and against stockpiling Mountain House freeze dried pouches.

One of my main issues with the pouches is the sodium content. When I eat a meal, a few minutes later I can feel the sodium hitting my system. Sometimes the sodium is so bad I feel sick all over.

Some people may say Mountain House freeze dried pouches are too expensive, and they are. There is no denying the freeze dried pouches cost a pretty penny.

Let’s talk about sodium content first. A couple of pouches were picked from my personal stockpile so we could look at the sodium content.

Sodium Content

Survivalist: What Is Your Prepping Goal

Survivalist, what is your prepping goal? Preppers can not be classified into several different categories. We have different groups who subscribe to different prepping plans. These go way beyond what organizations like FEMA and the Red Cross suggest.

We all know the government will not be able to help everyone. There are also situations that may result in the collapse of the federal and state governments, such as nuclear war or some kind of new disease.

For example, my personal prepping goal is presteading. Which is a combination of prepping an homesteading. The long term goal is to develop a homestead based off lessons learned from the middle ages, and combine those with modern homesteading.

People Who Stockpile May Say

Mountain House Extends Life of Pouches to 30 Years

Mountain House recently extended the life of their pouches to 30 years, instead of 7 years. This is supposed to be retroactive to existing pouches produced before the date change.

How I found about about the date change, I posted a video on youtube called Stockpiling mountain house #10 cans and pouches. Someone posted a comment saying “Your way out of date regarding the life of the pouches.” So I started a thread on the forum – When did mountain house pouches go to 30 years.

When I go hiking or camping, Mountain House is my “go to” food. I love the ease of just boiling water, adding it to the pouch and having a hot meal.

When it comes to stockpiling food for a long term SHTf even of collapse of society, nothing beats a #10 can.

Prepping For SHTF In Breadth But Not Depth

A few days ago I started reading a new book, it’s called “War on the eastern front by James Lucas.” War on the eastern front is a collection of personal experiences based on diaries from German soldiers.

The majority of books I read are non-fiction. This is because I like to know what real-life experiences people faced during times of hardship. For example what were some of the issues that were faced during the Black Death?

Why did I pick a book on the eastern front? We know the German army failed to defeat the Russian army due to two things – the harsh Russian winter, and resupply issues. Those are the two main issues taught in just about every world history class.

On page 4 of “War on the eastern front”, it is noted that author A.J.P Taylor said “while his opponents were rearming for a great war in depth, Hitler rearmed Germany in breath. Everything for the front lines, but nothing for a second campaign.”

Hitler was so sure the German army could defeat Russia in a single season, there were no plans for a long drawn out battle during the Russian winter. Nor were plans made for the following year, much less a war that lasted another 4 years.

Survivalism

Excess food supply

Over the past 2 days I have given away 2 dozen eggs. Some people might be saying “so what”? To give food away means that my wife and I have an excess food supply.

Think about that for a minute. My wife and I bought our first chicks February 25, 2012. In all we ended up with 13 chickens. The chickens started laying when they were around 5 months old. At close to 6 months old we are getting 6 – 7 eggs a day.

Home grown yard eggsWe are dealing with a couple of topics here, the time required to get your food production up and running, and being able to grow more food then you need.

I see a lot of survivalist saying that if SHTF they are going to get some chickens, goats, maybe a couple of cows,,, the usual stuff. I see those types of planes as being unrealistic. You think you are going to be the only person looking for farming supplies and livestock after SHTF / TEOTWAWKI?

Lets say you have a buddy that knows a friend whos second cousin has a few chickens they are willing to trade for 1,000 rounds of 223 Remington. After some bartering the two of you finally agree on 500 rounds of 223 Remington and 500 rounds of 7.62×39 for 2 laying hens.

You get your hens home, now what? Where are you going to keep them at? Do you have an enclosed yard to keep your chickens in, do you have a coop? Or do you plan on keeping the hens in your garage? Hopefully you will be lucky enough to find some hens that are already laying. If not, you are going to have to wait several months for the chicks to grow and start laying.

Its not just livestock, what does your seed stockpile look like? Do you have tools to work the field? Do you have access to a tractor, tiller, hoes, rakes and manpower needed to get a field ready to plant?

After you get your squash, cucumbers, zucchini, turnips, snap beans,,,,etc planted, you are looking at 60 – 90 days before you are going to harvest anything.

MRE VS Freeze Dried: Which Is Better For Stockpiling

MRE VS Freeze Dried, which one do you stockpile for a long term SHTF / TEOTWAWKI survival situation? Personally, I have uses for both. My food stockpile contains an assortment of MREs, freze dried 7 year pouches and several #10 cans of Mountain House freeze dried food.

When my buddies and I go on our annual camping trip on the Angelia River, I usually bring 7 year pouches for my main entree, and a couple of MREs for assorted snacks.

Lets discuss the various good and bad points of both. First, lets talk about MREs, and then freeze dried food.

MREs – Meals Ready to Eat

Something that is very important to my family and I is sodium content. My wife has high blood pressure, and my dad has heart issues. While stockpiling food, it is important to take special needs into consideration.

This is a partial list of sodium content to various MREs I have in my stockpile.

  • Beef ravioli in meat sauce – 1,080mg
  • Beef Stew – 850mg
  • Beverage Powder, Grape – 150mg
  • Beverage Base Powder, Lime Lime – 20mg – 150mg
  • Beverage Base Powder, Orange – 20mg – 150mg
  • Cappuccino, Mocha – 0mg
  • Cappuccino, French Vanilla – 0mg
  • Cinnamon Imperials – 12mg

For the full list, visit this article about sodium content in MREs.

Food Fatigue After SHTF / TEOTWAWKI

Food fatigue = eating the same thing over, and over, and over, and over,,,. Eventually leads to vitamin and mineral deficiencies; extreme cases of malnutrition can lead to death. Food fatigue, vitamin and mineral deficiencies go hand in hand.

Couple of examples:

Pellagra – vitamin deficiency caused by a lack of niacin. Seen in people who eat a diet of mostly corn based products.

Scurvy – caused by long term vitamin C deficiency.

Eat the same thing over and over and over,,, everyday, people develop food fatigue. When people get fatigued, they stop eating. When people stop eating, they starve and eventually die.

How do we prevent food fatigue? We stockpile a range of assorted foods, and we have a source of fresh food.

Lets say that some kind of long term SHTF / TEOTWAWKI situation happens, what are your plans to ward off food fatigue? Are you stockpiling a wide range of foods? What are your sources of fresh food? What are your renewable food sources?

Stockpiling Food

Self-Centered Preppers

For this article, the term “Self-Centered Preppers” means people who only think of themselves while preparing for TEOTWAWKI. All they are concerned about is themselves, and “maybe” their close family. No consideration goes into planning for friends, or anyone outside their immediate family members.

A prime example of Self-Centered Preppers might be people who plan on bugging out to the wilderness. How is your family going to deal with the sudden isolation? How are you going to deal with being cut off from friends and family members? How are your friends and family members going to handle a sudden loose of contact with you and your family?

If humanity were to suffer some kind of long term SHTF situation, my family would turn to people such as my dad, and myself for guidance. It is my resp0onsiblity to make sure my family has plenty to eat, protected and that they will be provided of.

Self-Centered Prepper does not care about anyone else. What about your grand kids? What about your kids that can not afford to stockpile food at this time? What about your parents, brothers, sisters, close cousins,,,,?

Friendships are an asset

Prepping For The Everyday Person

Some people take prepping a little too far. They prepare for the worst regardless of where they are at or what they are doing. I agree with having a get home bag, but on the other side of the coin there are people that keep a complete Bug Out Bag along with a small arsenal in their vehicle.

Reading what some people post in forums, its like they are prepping for a zombie invasion to breakout at any second. Unlike what is portrayed on TV, the majority of preppers do not live on the fringe of society. We are everyday people living in the cities, suburbs and rural areas all across the world.

When people look at prepping, they get on the forum and get a little overwhelmed by what they see. It is easy to forget that some of the members of the forum have been prepping for decades.

Prepping is not for the lazy. Sure you can buy some rice and throw it in an airtight box, buy some canned foods and think you have a well rounded survival plan.

Prepping For SHTF in the Wrong Order

After talking to a buddy of mine, we came to the realization that most preppers stockpile in the wrong order.

When people get into prepping, what is the first things they start stockpiling? Most people lean towards stockpiling firearms and ammunition first.

Why do most people place buying a firearm at the top of their list? Maybe its the sense of security that owning a firearm provides? Maybe its the idea of the family being able to protect themselves? Maybe its a primal feeling where we feel safe and secure with a spear in our hands?

Ok, lets get back to prepping.

This is the way most people prep

1. Firearms

2. Short term food preps

3. Sustainable food preps

This is the way people should prep

1. Sustainable food preps

2. Short term food preps

3. Firearms

Sustainable Food Preps

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